Farmgirl Patience

Patience is not always a word that is associated with me. That is why simplifying and living out in the country has been and IS good for me.  Patience has been taught to me over the last year in a number of ways in our new home.  When I run out of something I just have to wait to get it on my next errand trip which is probably several days away rather than 15 minutes, mail takes a little longer from here to there, trips to anywhere are a number of miles rather than blocks, dryting clothes outside is rewarding, but slower than the dryer, etc.  I have totally loved all these changes and I definitely feel calmer on all counts.

BUT, my lovely tomatoes and red peppers have been hanging at green for weeks.  I find myself constantly looking at them, talking to them and PLEADING with them to all turn red.  I started to think something was wrong—too hot, too cold, too sunny, too shady, too many pests, too little compost…. what could it be???  I am gardening organically and have been quite confident in this choice even with the naysayers saying “it can be done around here.”  BUT with hundreds of veggies looking at me and staying green I began to wonder what I did wrong?

So GOOGLE to the rescue.  Believe it or not, when I googled “tomatoes not turning red” I got a TON of hits. Seems that  I am not the only one experiencing this phenomenon; misery loves company you know!  I read and read and read.  All the blogs, forums and articles brought me to my issue…..

LACK OF PATIENCE!

Yep, patience.  I need to be patient.  Some varieties take 60 plus days to turn red after the blossom is fertilized.  It is not unusual at all for tomatoes to turn in September even.  AND I found out our temperatures of low 80’s are perfect for our tomato plants. WHEW!!!!  Ok, so now I feel better; the only err in my gardening my tomatoes seems to be with me—patience!  Yep.  Another lesson and a happy one.  I will patiently await the onset of lots of red tomatoes and peppers.  In the meantime, I will enjoy the few that I am getting now.

Patience… how about you?  What challenges your patience?

4 thoughts on “Farmgirl Patience

  1. If your whole vine is filled with tomatoes, you can stop watering them. They will think it is the end of the season and will scramble to ripen to makes seeds for carrying on the species. If it has rained an unusual amount, putting a shovel into the ground around the plant to cut off the majority of roots will have the same effect. Patience is the best virtue!! Thanks for a great post.

  2. I know what you mean! My tomato issue was that my fruits are small…then I visited the farm of a man who teaches people how to grow tomatoes in the Pacific Northwest (no easy task), and learned that the variety I was growing produces a small tomato! Everything I was doing was just fine.

    Google has been a lifesaver for me as a gardener. Even though I have lots of books, it’s a great way to get good information on those little daily gardening questions that come up.

    As to patience, well, I’m not sure I have any advice to offer. When you have that one figured out, let me know!

    • LOL. If only google could solve the patience problem. 🙂 I love google too. There are so many forums and blogs. When I am feeling insecure or unsure in what I am doing in this new farmgirl life I go there and MJ Farm!

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